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Can You Copyright a Fight Song or a School Motto?

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The other day, I was having a conversation about copyright law, you see I am an online article author, and I produced a number of e-books, and before my stint as a writer, I was quite concerned with protecting our company operations manual from getting in the hands of competitors. I’ve been mildly successful at all of those things above, and therefore have quite a bit of both positive and negative experiences when it comes to copyright law.

Now then, during our conversation we got on the subject of copywriting quotes, mottos, poems, and even school fight songs which are often used at football, basketball, and other athletic competitions. Obviously, if you have a good fight song, let’s say you are a university or college, someone might hijack that, and use it in their high school in some little town somewhere in the United States. Now then, as a big university you probably don’t care if a high school uses it at their football game.

Nevertheless, it is your brand and your school fight song, and you do need to protect it. A very short quotation or school motto could be trademarked. However, it’s difficult to trademark something you haven’t used in interstate commerce. Nevertheless, if you are University and you travel to other states for athletic competitions that would suffice, therefore you could trademark it. If you do, you have more teeth legally if someone uses it without your permission.

Of course, if your school motto is several sentences long, and your fight song has several verses, then obviously a trademark is completely the wrong venue, and you will not be able to secure that from the USPTO. Therefore, can a copyright suffice? In other words, if you put a little “c” at the bottom which alerts everyone that you claim copyright, and they can’t use it without your permission, and of course you would grant them the permission ever – therefore it’s safe right?

Hardly, someone might still try to take it – they may even use it on their blog, or modify the words to make your school look bad. In that case they are violating your copyright in many regards, but you still have to defend that. They might claim that they added significant new value by changing the words and trashing your school fight song, therefore it’s okay? Well, legally they might have a good defense in that case under the “fair use” principle – however that doesn’t make you or your school very happy.

And if you think that won’t or can’t happen, think again, it happens all the time. The problem with trademarks, patents, copyrights, and other things of this nature is even if you claim the copyright, have a registered trademark, or have actually filed a patent for something, that’s where the fun starts, from then on out you still have to defend it. That costs money, it takes time, and the Internet is rampant with the hijacking of copyrighted material. Indeed I hope you will please consider all this and think on it. In the meantime good luck.



Source by Lance Winslow

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Ktwon Fame gets a Co-sign from Drake on New Single ‘I’m Up Now’

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Ktwon Fame gets a Co-sign from Drake on New Single 'I’m Up Now'

Even some of the most tapped-in industry insiders couldn’t have predicted the remarkable rise of rapper Ktwon Fame.

Keatwon Bonnett, famously known as Ktwon Fame, is a professional music artist from Bastrop Louisiana that moved to Dallas, Tx at the age of 9. He brings a versatile sound to the industry that no one has ever heard.

He just dropped a new single called “I’m Up Now” that has quickly gained a buzz around the Dallas area. Recently, the single was co-signed by Drake on Instagram which has garnered even more buzz around his name in the Dallas area.

A Drake co-sign pulls an artist up a rung on the ladder, and if an artist follows that moment up with something great, they can stay at that rung, or start to climb higher. Ktwon plans to seize this moment to be the next artist to blow up out of Dallas.

Take a listen to Ktwon Fame’s new single ‘I’m Up Now’ below.

Connect with Ktwon Fame on social media for updates on new music, videos, and more; @ktwonfamemusic





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Fast Rising Philly Rapper FARGO Shares Music Video for ‘LOGS’

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Fast Rising Philly Rapper FARGO Shares Music Video for 'LOGS'

Brandon Powell, Known professionally as FARGO, is an american rapper. Born and raised in Philadelphia more specifically the Kensington and Alleghany area. He began rapping at the age of 12 and joined a local rap group. Through many hardships with the group he strived to become a solo act.

The philly-based hip-hop artist is eager to take his career to new heights before 2021 slowly but surely comes to a close. He has spent the last few years dialling in his sound and now believes he is ready to take his career all the way. His goal for this upcoming year is to become a house hold name in the rap industry.

FARGO’s limitless amounts of talent and ability to make music over any type of beat is something that very few artists in his class have and he’s using that to his advantage.  In his endeavors to make it big time in the music industry, he recently released a new song titled “LOGS” with an accompanying music video which showcases his talents as an artist.

Be sure to check out his new release and keep your eyes peeled as it is far from the last time, you’ll be hearing his name.

Connect with FARGO on social media for updates on new music, videos, and more; @lilfargo__





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What is the Difference Between Popping and Locking?

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Locking is often confused with other dance styles, most notably popping. What is locking? Is it street dance, is it hip-hop dance, is it a funk style?

The answer to this question will draw different responses from different people. However it is generally accepted that it falls under the general ‘street dance category.’

It is generally accepted to be part of hip-hop history and the wider term ‘hip hop dance’ to include locking, popping and breaking.

It is also termed under the ‘funk styles’ term which is probably the most precise if you want to give it a label.

Usually it is confused with popping because locking and popping both came into being at around the same time, locking coming just before popping in the late sixties. Also many of the early adopters of these dance styles would do performances incorporating both popping and locking in them.

However it is important to note that these are two completely different dance styles. When locking and popping are done in the same performance it is sometimes called ‘pop-locking’ a slightly ambiguous term which has drawn many voices into the discussion whether it is an appropriate term.

Politics aside, locking is deemed to be one style and popping is one style. Locking is generally a lot looser incorporating ‘stops’ where the movement is stopped before continuing in relation with the funk rhythms.

A lot of the time the postures are quite relaxed and muscles relaxed before they may strengthen up in the actual stops.

Popping on the other hand makes use of flexing or contracting and relaxing of muscles. Often the dancer is popping different parts of the body at the same time.

Both dances draw on certain key elements in their respective styles. For example in locking, ‘stopping’ the moves and grooving certain moves are prerequisites however the moves themselves may carry many forms and variations.

The same applies to popping, the technique of ‘popping’ the muscles is used in different moves which may look different but carry the technique of popping in their execution.

Whether to include both locking and popping, or just one of them in a performance is at the dancers’ discretion. Usually they would need to have some level of proficiency in both styles to attempt this while many dancers like to base performances around one style.

Of course the best way to differentiate between the dance styles is to watch each of the styles in their own right. Watching a few videos of just pure locking or just pure popping will show you the stylistic elements and many of the popular moves that each style includes.

And then when you come to watch a performance that incorporates multifarious dance styles you can say, “That is some popping”, or “that is some locking.” Quickly followed by, “I know the difference between locking and popping.”



Source by Kevin Shwe

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